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20 Feb 2019
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Things To Do

When was the last time you explored the natural wonders of the Washington Coast? When did you last breathe in the salty air and take in the world renowned sights along the north beach of Grays Harbor?

For over a century the Washington Coast has been the destination for visitors far and wide, searching for that quintessential moment along this stretch of land along Pacific Ocean. The natural attractions of the Washington Coast are second to none, making this a can’t miss vacation location. Now, with the community of Seabrook, serving as the perfect basecamp for adventure and relaxation, the highlights of the region are a stone’s throw away. 

Copalis Beach and the Ghost Forest

On January 26th, 1700, a 9.0 earthquake rocked the Washington Coast, changing the landscape of the region. One of those changes was along the Copalis River, where a section of land became submerged underwater, killing the trees and creating a ghost forest. Today, the Ghost Forest can be reached easily by kayak tours led by Buck Giles at Buck’s Bikes in Seabrook. When exploring Copalis, the other can’t miss adventure is walking the beach to the mouth of the river. On this short walk, you’ll find solace among sand dollars and seagulls while enjoy the salty air of the Pacific.  

Kalaloch’s Tree of Life and Ruby Beach

North of Seabrook, Kalaloch Beach is a can’t miss destination in Olympic National Park. Home to two of the best attractions on Highway 101, no trip to the coast is complete without stopping here. The Tree of Life can be found near the Kalaloch Campground, just a short walk from the parking area. The tree is hanging on above a cave on the bluff, precariously perched and beautifully framed. After you see the tree, hop back in the car and drive a few miles north to Ruby Beach, where iconic sea stacks and incredible views await. 

Third Beach and Strawberry Falls

Just south of the town of LaPush, which is the furthest west zip code in the contiguous United States, you’ll find the short trail to Olympic National Park’s Third Beach and Strawberry Falls. Popular in the summer months, this trail rewards hikers with a pristine Pacific Northwest beach and a chance to see a waterfall tumbling into the ocean below.

Hole in the Wall

North of LaPush, at Rialto Beach, Hole in the Wall is considered one of the best hikes in Olympic National Park. Just a few miles in length, this hike is flat and leads to a series of sea stacks, one of which has a hole the size of a bus that you can walk through. Make sure you check a tide chart, as Hole in the Wall is only accessible during low tide. If you can, enjoy a sunset from the trailhead. 

The Mouth of the Hoh River

Often overlooked, taking a quick jaunt off of Highway 101 to see the mouth of the Hoh River is highly recommended. The Hoh, full of salmon and seals during the fall months, is incredible all year long. The waters you see here are from the glaciers on nearby Mount Olympus, flowing through the rainforest before reaching the breaking waves of the Pacific. With very few visitors and zero amenities, this is a great place to sit back and relax. 

Lake Ozette and the Ozette Triangle Hike

While a full day trip from Seabrook, Lake Ozette and the Ozette Triangle hike is considered one of the best coast hikes in America. Starting at Lake Ozette, the trail is roughly nine miles in length, wandering along boardwalks before reaching the coast. Along the coast, you’ll find sea stacks, tide pools and even ancient petroglyphs carved along the rocks. Remember to check the tide charts, as the hike is no fun during high tide. 

Damon Point

Down at the southern tip of Ocean Shores, a sandy spit sticks into the water between the waters of Grays Harbor and the Pacific Ocean. The walk on the beach is a classic, giving you views of the Olympic Mountains, the Pacific Ocean and the town of Westport across the water.  It is also one of the best places on the Washington Coast to find agates, shells and petrified wood. 

Leadbetter Point State Park and the Long Beach Peninsula

A few hours from Seabrook, Leadbetter State Park is at the tip of the west coast’s longest, uninterrupted beach. What makes this a can’t miss attraction, besides the remote coastal hiking and incredible sandy beaches, is that is that each spring the area becomes a stopping point for hundreds of thousands of migrating shorebirds. Even if you miss the great shorebird migration, Leadbetter and Longbeach have some cool stops, museums and places to explore. 

Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge

Nestled along the eastern shores of Grays Harbor, the National Wildlife Refuge is a great place to get to know the natural ebb and flow of the region. Bringing in a quarter million shorebirds each spring, and dozens of other migratory and local birds throughout the year, the wildlife refuge is a great quick stop on the way to Seabrook. Short hikes await those who leave their cars, giving them glimpses of eagles, falcons, blue herons and more. 

Westport Lighthouse and Grayland Beach

Finally, no trip to the coast is complete without a visit to the Westport lighthouse, which is open seasonally. Down in Westport, on the other side of Grays Harbor from Seabrook, you’ll find Westport Light State Park. With a tall lighthouse to explore, as well as miles of beach to wander and paved trails to bike, you’ll get a feel for the sweeping dunes of Grays Harbor’s south beach. 

The Perfect Home Base For Exploring The Washington Coast

After finish exploring the Washington Coast, head back to your luxurious and cozy Seabrook cottage. Our list of high-end accommodations features top-notch furnishings and convenient town amenities. Whether you want to take a dip in our indoor community pool and Jacuzzi, ride a bike on the beach, or workout in our fitness center, our town makes travel to the Olympic Peninsula easy and comfortable.

Ready to embark on your wild and exciting adventure to the Pacific Northwest? Check our area map and list of rentals to book your trip!

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